Recycling Cancer-Fighting Tools; MU Researchers Working to Produce Vital Radioisotopes at a Cheaper Cost

Silvia Jurisson and her team are exploring alternate materials that could be used to help recycle the metals used to produce rad

According to the World Nuclear Association, more than 10,000 hospitals worldwide use radioisotopes in medicine. Molybdenum-99, the parent isotope of technetium-99m, is the most widely used radioisotope for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. However, production costs and the limited viability of the isotope can be a challenge for clinicians and healthcare providers. Now, nuclear researchers at the University of Missouri are exploring alternate materials that could be used to help recycle the metals used to produce radioisotopes more efficiently and with less waste. Scientists believe this cheaper method could result in a cost savings for healthcare providers who could pass those savings on to patients.